Child Injuries

Even with the precautions of child safety gates, car seats and plugs for electric outlets, children can still get hurt or die when defective products get through the safety nets. Toys and jewelry with lead paint. Magnets that can be swallowed then tear a little one’s intestines. Harmful teething numbing creams promoted for toddlers. Vaporizers that cause face and limb scarring forever. All of these products and more should never be allowed on the market but they slip through and contribute to unfortunate child injuries.

The law requires rigorous safety standards for the prevention of child injuries But the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), who is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death from consumer products, says the incidents are still too high. Incidents such as property damage, severe child injuries, and the wrongful death of a child cost the nation more than $900 billion annually. From inflatable pool slides that deflate while in use and safety locks that fail to a day care center forgetting a child in a hot, unattended van for 6 hours, all forms of child injuries caused by another are not acceptable.

The wrongful death of a child in Florida who was left more than six hours in a sweltering van outside Katie’s Kids Learning Center has to be the most tragic of all child injuries. It turns out that the day care center allowed a driver who had convictions for speeding, failing to yield, and improperly restraining a child with the responsibility of transporting their children. Apparently, traffic violations were not part of the Center’s background check—and pickup and drop-off logs were not properly verified by a second person as the state law requires.

Recalls Based Upon Child Injuries

Sold at Wal-Mart and Toys R Us outlets, Banzai inflatable pool slides have been recalled since May of 2012 due to severe child injuries and death risks. It turns out that the bottom of the plastic slides, designed for in-ground pools, can deflate during use and cause swimmers using the slide to severely injure themselves. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), there have been at least three cases where the recalled pool slides, have maimed or killed swimmers.

Additional child injuries necessitated the May 2012 recall of Safety 1st toilet and cabinet locks. The locks failed to keep children out of toilet bowls and prevent drowning. They also failed to secure household cabinets containing harmful home cleaners and other chemicals, and failed to protect children from accessing small objects that caused choking. So far, 110 reports of failing toilet locks and 278 incidents of failing cabinet slide locks have been made. Sold through Target, Wal-Mart, Bed, Bath and Beyond and Amazon, families are asked to immediately stop using the products with the following model numbers: Safety 1st Sure Fit toilet locks 48003 and 48103 and Safety 1st cabinet slide locks 12013 and 12014.

If your child was killed or seriously injured as a result of a child injury, we know that no amount of money can make up for the trauma you are facing. But we hope compensation for the child injuries from the parties at fault can help you cover medical expenses and feel that justice was served. Contact us.